28.10.12

Okar Research...Regional Map of Interest

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Regions of historical interest include Eastern Iran (Takzig/Khorasan), Bactra (Balkh)/Kapisa, Kashmir/Gilgit (Od'iana) and Mt Kailas (ZangZung)

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

October 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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26.9.12

TIBETAN PLAGIARISM, SECTARIAN EDITING, MONASTIC POLITICS

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Notes from Jamgon Kongtrul's Retreat Manual by Jamgon Kongtrul.....translated by Ngawang Zangpo.....ISBN: 9781559390293

Plagiarism...

Jamgon Kongtrul writes on Page 42 of his Retreat Manual....."I borrowed from the works of others to compose whatever treatises were appropriate."

Translator note....."Plagiarism was and is rife in Tibetan scholarship, where it seems to be looked upon favorably as indicative of an author's respect for great masters. Ths comment by Kongtrul was probaby written in a spirit of humility rather than as an admission of wrong-doing."

Sectarianism...

"Since the second propagation on the Buddist doctrine in Tibet, in which teachings of non-Indian origin were dismissed, the ancient Nyingma teachings had been severely suppressed. Therefore the teachings of the Dzogchen system traditions received the greater attention of the three great Rimay masters." (Kongtrul:1995..pg 28)..."

Jamgon Kongtrul Page 31 of his Retreat Manual...."Kongtrul is known as one of the foremast masters of the non-sectarian view, however he makes it clear in his autobiography that he did not arrive at this perspective without first experiencing a regrettable bout of sectarianism."

Monastic Politics....

Jamgon Kongtrul Page 34 of his Retreat Manual......"in order that Jamgon Kongtrul might remain at Palpung Monastery he was "recognized" as a reincarnation of a past master of the monastery...a monastery could be asked at any time to send any promising monk to serve in a monastic or political institution high up in the heirarchial ladder. An exception was made in the case of incarnate masters of the monastery....Palpung used that loophole to protect Kongtrul against bureaucratic headhunters from Dergay, the capital...he was re-named Kongtrul after Kongpo Vamteng Trulku....after he received the name "Kongtrul" he never once used it when signing any of his works....he refers to himself as "Jamgon Lama".

Editing...

"The work of Shenrap still exists in Tibet in the form of 400 volumes, but it has undergone heavy Buddhist editing." (The Heart of the Buddha (Dharma Ocean Series) by Chogyam Trungpa...1978 .....pg 220)

BUDDHISM WITHOUT SECTARIANISM,The Venerable Deshung Rinpoche

"Yet there is the danger of taking hold of Dharma wrongly. If this danger is not avoided and one's approach to Dharma is faulty, 'Dharma' becomes a cause of harm instead of benefit. This is not the intent of the Enlightened Ones nor of those masters who have entrusted it to us....Recognise and avoid this danger: it is called 'narrow-mindedness'. It manifests in sangha circles in the form of sectarianism: an attitude of partiality, a tendency to form deluded attachments to ones own order and to reject other schools of Buddhism as inferior.
I have seen this narrow-minded spirit detract from Buddhism in my own land of Tibet and, during the past 20 years of my stay in America, I have also seen it grow among the many Dharma centers founded here by Tibetan teachers and their disciples. It is always with sorrow that I observe sectarianism take root among Dharma centers. It is my karma, as a representative of Buddhism and as a Tibetan, to have the opportunity and responsibility to speak out, when asked, against this 'inner foe'.
It was common in Tibet for the least spiritually developed adherents of each of the four great orders to nurture this spirit of sectarianism. Often monks and lay disciples of one order would refuse to attend the services of other orders. Monks would refuse to study or read the literature of others simply because they were the writings of masters who belonged to another lineage - -- no matter how good the literature might be.
The great Nyingma order - - - the Order of the Ancient Ones - - -has its own special pride. Some of its followers feel that, as members of the earliest school, they have profound doctrines unknown to the later schools of Tibetan Buddhism. They maintain that somehow their doctrine of 'Great Perfection, is superior to the 'Mahamudra' perception of ultimate reality. They make this claim even though, by logic and the teachings of the Buddha Himself, we know it is not possible that there could be any difference in the realization of ultimate reality. They also claim that theirs is a superior path endowed with secret teachings and levels of Dharma unknown to the other schools.
The Gelugpa school, founded by the great Tsongkhapa, has its proud adherents, too. They think they are sole guardians of the teachings that were transmitted into Tibet by the great pundit Atisha, even though these are available and commonly practiced in the other orders. They have pride in proclaiming a superiority in moral conduct. They feel their observance of monastic discipline and their custom of devoting many years to study before finally turning to the practice of meditation constitute a superior approach to Vajrayana practice. They consider themselves to be superior both in deportment and in learning.
Certain followers of the Sakya order also have their conceit about learning. They believe that only their school understands and preserves the profound teachings that were introduced into Tibet from Buddhist India. It is common for these Sakya scholars to look down on the practitioners of other orders, thinking that other Tibetan Buddhists are ignorant practitioners whose practice is not supported by right understanding of the Dharma's true meaning.
Some Kagyu adherents have their own special pride. They claim that their lineage of masters is so superior that they themselves should be considered superior --- as heirs of Tilopa, Naropa, Marpa, Milarepa and Dagpo. These masters, it is true, were very great but it does not necessarily follow that one who claims to be an adherent of their tradition is also great. The greatness of these masters depends upon their realization. Blind allegiance to these masters cannot make Kagyu practitioners superior.
All of these are attitudes commonly found among Tibetan Buddhist monks and lay people. They may be common attitudes but they are not Buddhist attitudes. The great Kagyu master and Ris-med proponent, Kongtrul Rinpoche, stated that a wise person will have faith in the teachings of all orders, will love the Dharma found in each just as a mother cherishes all her children. A wise person's mind is vast like the sky, with room for many teachings, many insights, many meditations. But the mind of an ignorant sectarian is limited, tight, and narrow like a vase that can only hold so much. It is difficult for such a mind to grow in Dharma because of its self-imposed limitations. The difference between the wise Buddhist and the sectarian Buddhist is like that between the vastness of space and the narrowness of a vase. These are the words of Kongtrul Rinpoche:
The great sage of the Sakya Order, Sapan wrote in his Three Vows that, in his youth, he studied extensively the literature of all the orders of Tibet, under different masters. He made special efforts to learn, understand, and realize the doctrines of these different schools and never despised any of them. He cherished them all.
Long-chen Rab-jampa, the great scholar of the Nyingma Order, practiced similarly. He received transmission of Dharma from masters of all four orders without discrimination. From the biography of the great Tsongkhapa, we learn that he, too, studied extensively under masters of all orders. The great Khyentse Wangpo, foremost teacher of the Ris-med, or non-sectarian movement, wrote in his autobiography that in his youth he had studied under one hundred and fifty masters of all the four orders of Tibetan Buddhism.
Kongtrul Rinpoche, another Ris-med master, included all the essential doctrines of each of the four orders, as well as of the minor subsects, in his great masterpiece, The Treasure of Doctrine.
http://www.quietmountain.org/links/teachings/nonsect.htm

771 AD.....After Trisong Detsen proclaimed Buddhism the official religion of Tibet in 771 CE a great wave of resentment against foreigners swept the Tibetan religious aristocracy. Dr. Guenther suggests that Padmasambhava was caught up in this and the rejection of Chinese Chan Buddhism, with which Dzogchen has some similarity, and that this was the reason for Padmasambhava’s rather precipitous departure from the country prior to the completion of Samye in 775 CE, along with many other foreigners. He is reputed to have travelled to Bhutan, after which he is lost to history.

10th Trungpa Tulku, Chokyi Nyingche and the 3rd Rolpe Dorje. This photo was was probably taken in the early 1930's. Both of these tulkus were imprisoned by the armies of the Central Government of Tibet, which was trying to take back ethnic Tibetan lands under the control of the Republic of China. The Central Government tried to get Surmang --the only large landlord in the region, to pay taxes to them instead of the regional Chinese government under the direction of Gen. Ma Pufeng. When Surmang refused, they sacked the monastery and imprisoned the two tulkus. Rolpe Dorje Rinpoche was a terton and a thangka painter as well.....Lee Weingrad on Facebook

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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MASTER WARRIORS

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MASTER WARRIOR..."Those who have been fearless in their search and fearless in their proclamation belong to the lineage of master warriors, whatever their religion, philosophy, or creed...They are the fathers and mothers of Shambhala." (Trungpa: 1984..pg 179)...."The basic quality of the master warrior is that his presence evokes the experience of the cosmic mirror and the magic of perception in others." (Trungpa: 1984...pg 176)..."The master warrior has relaxed completely into the unconditional purity of the cosmic mirror." (Trungpa: 1984..pg 177)..."the birth of the master warrior takes place in the realm of the cosmic mirror. The master warrior is humble, extremely humble." ...(Trungpa: 1984..pg 176-178)

Ayu Khandro, (Ayu Khandro Dorje Paldrön) (1838–1953) was a teacher of Dzogchen and Tantric Buddhism in East Tibet. She was a student of both Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo and Nyala Pema Dündul.....Ayu Khandro was held to be an incarnation of Vajrayogini. She spent many dozen years in dark retreat and also practiced and taught a tantric long-life practice and was an adept chödpa......She is said to have transmitted her knowledge and gave empowerments to Chogyal Namkhai Norbu Rinpoche.

Excerpts From: Tsultrim Allione's "Women of Wisdom"......

Namkhai Norbu: "after a journey of three days, we arrived at A-Yu Khadro's place in Dzongsa. She lived in a little stone hut near a river in a meadow under the cliff face of a mountain to the east of a small Sakya monastery. The hut was tiny; with no windows." She had two assistants, an old man, Palden, and an old nun, Zangmo. They were also strong practitioners of yoga and meditation.

We were very happy and amazed to see this situation. When we entered Khadro's room for the first time, only one butter lamp was lit. She was 113 at that time, but she did not look particularly ancient. She had very long hair that reached her knees. It was black at the tips and white at the roots. Her hands looked like the hands of a young woman. She wore a dark-red dress and a meditation belt over her left shoulder. During our visit we requested teachings, but she kept saying that she was no one special and had no qualifications to teach.

...the next meeting she told me that she had had an auspicious dream that night of her teacher, Jamyang Khentse Wangpo.5 He had advised her to give me the teachings of Khadro Sangwa Kundu,6 his gongter. This was not the teaching I had asked for, but was a teaching she had received from him directly which she had practiced extensively. .....The next day around eleven we began the initiation of Khadro Sangdu. From that day on, every morning she gave teachings including the practices of the subtle nerves and the subtle breath. In the afternoon at the end of her meditation session, she gave further explanation of the Khadro Sangdu and the Chod of Machig Lapdron, the Zinba Rangdrol. This was the Chod practice she had done for many years when she was younger.

A month later, she began the Yang-Ti, one of the most important of the Dzog Chen teachings in the most advanced Upadesha series, having to do with the practice in the dark. This teaching took five days. Then she began teaching on the Longchen Nying Thig. ....

in the Year of the Wood Bird, 1885, in the first month on the day of the dakini I began a seven-year retreat. From the beginning I spent most of my time doing the practice in the dark. At first this was sometimes difficult so I alternated the dark and light,* but the majority of the time was spent in complete darkness.

Ayu Khandro....."When I was fifty-three, in the Year of the Iron Rabbit, 1891, in the fifth month on the day of Padma Sambhava, when I was doing practice in the dark, I had a vision. I saw a very clear sphere; inside it were many dakinis carrying another sphere with the form of Jamyang Khentse Wongpo inside. I was sure this meant that he had been invited by the dakinis to leave this world of suffering.....Although I still had seven months before the end of the seven years I had promised myself to complete, I decided it was more important to see him before he left his body. So I left my hut and a few days later went directly to him in Dzongsar.....http://www.khandro.net/book-womenofwisdom.htm

(Dark retreat (Tibetan: mun mtshams) refers to advanced practices in the Dzogchen lineages of the Nyingmapa, Bönpo and other schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The time period dedicated to dark retreat varies from a few hours to decades. Dark Retreat in the Himalayan tradition is a restricted practice only to be engaged by the senior spiritual practitioner under appropriate spiritual guidance. This practice is considered conducive for navigating the bardo at the time of death and for realising the rainbow body. The traditional dark retreat requires stability in the natural state and is only suitable for advanced practitioners. Ayu Khandro and Dilgo Khyentse are examples of modern, if not contemporary, practitioners of significant periods of Dark Retreat sadhana. Ayu Khandro performed the Yang-Ti (Tibetan), an advanced practice of the Dzogchen Upadesha, a version of the Dark Retreat.)

A-yu Kha'dro www.khandro.net Tsultrim Allione's Women of Wisdom is a compilation of the namthars several remarkable women of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Many of these biographies are hagiography, since legendary aspects are included.

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THE GREAT TIBETAN RIMAY TEACHER JAMGON KONGTRUL (Lodro Taye: 1813-1899)..."One may wonder why this description of the universe does not accord with that of other systems. The Enlightened Ones did not view any aspect of either the environment or the inhabitants of our world system as ultimately real. Therefore, the teachings are not one that, based on a belief in a single view, sets forth a particular system as the only valid one. Instead, they spoke in response to the various levels of capabilities, interests, and dispositions of those to be guided to enlightenment." ...(Jamgon Kongtrul:Myriad Worlds...1995..pg 166).

His father was Tendzin Yungdrung a Bonpo Lama, and of the royal Khyung clan of accomplished practitioners,..Milarepa's ancestors were nomads of the Khyungpo (khyung po) clan from the northern region of the “central horn,” (dbus ru) one of two administrative regions of Tibet's central province (dbus).

JAMGON KONGTRUL THE GREAT..."Well the worst that can happen now is that they will kill you. It is best to stay at least a hundred miles from a center of dispute."...Letter from Khyentse Rinpoche quoted in Myriad Worlds. It is in reference to threats made to Jamgon Kongtrul because he gave teachings and empowerments in the both the ancient Bon and Nyingma traditions. He continued to support these traditions throughout his life. It was 22 years before he returned to the monastery referred to.

The autobiography of Jamgon Kongtrul Lodro Thaye shows that there was a period where he had to leave the monastery of Palpung, the seat of the Tai Situpas. In 1873 the King of Derge visited Palpung. While he was there, a great number of monks gave him an indictment which accused Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche and Bontrul Rinpoche. Khyentse Rinpoche advised the king not to pay attention to the matter. He said that this would greatly harm the buddhist teachings in Eastern Tibet, but the young Situ Tulku, Pema Kunsang, insisted on a judicial investigation. It was done, with the effect that most of the accusations were proved to be invalid. However, Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche and Bontrul Rinpoche had to leave Palpung. The latter died shortly thereafter and Jamgon Rinpoche did not come back to Palpung until the death of Situ Pema Kunsang 14 years later.

JAMGON KONGTRUL (Lodro Taye: 1813-1899)... "One may wonder why this description of the universe does not accord with that of other systems. The Buddhas did not view any aspect of either the environment or the inhabitants of our world system as ultimately real. Therefore, the teachings are not one that, based on a belief in a single view, sets forth a particular system as the only valid one. Instead, the Buddhas spoke in response to the various levels of capabilities, interests, and dispositions of those to be guided to enlightenment." ...(Jamgon Kongtrul:Myriad Worlds...1995..pg 166)....(Jam-mgon: gentle protector)...'Was never argumentative and sophistic, and he never aligns himself with a particular point of view. He also defends, albeit humbly, philosophies, schools, and masters that have been attacked." (Kongtrul: 1995..pg 37)...."Jamgon Kongtrul made things more curious by writing in his work: 'dgra-bla'."..(Karmay: 1975..pg 218)...

THOMAS MERTON...."He was the first genuine person I met from the West. We had dinner together in Calcutta and talked about spiritual materialism. We drank many gin and tonics. We planned to work on a book containing sacred writings of Christianity and Buddhism." (Trungpa: Heart of the Buddha..pg 213)

SUZUKI ROSHI..."In June of 1970. I first met Suzuki Roshi; an old man with a piercing look...all his gestures and communications were naked and to the point, like dealing with the burning tip of an incense stick...Roshi talked about the fact that Americans name only their biggest mountains, (like conquerors)...they can't be bothered to name the smaller mountains and the details"...(Trungpa:Garuda 1:1972..pg 45)....."If you cling to some idea created by you, like self, or to some objective world, you will be lost in what you created by your mind. One after another you are creating many kinds of worlds. There is no end to it." (Suzuki Roshi...Garuda 1:1972)

DO KHYENTSE..(1800-1859)...."was a highly eccentric master. Was like a Samurai, with his long hair, his rakish clothes, and his passion for riding beautiful horses." Great story about Do Khentse knocking out Patrul Rinpoche in: (Sogyal: 1992..pg 157.)...."Do Khyentse wrote a book of Dzogchen teachings in the style and language of the Gesar epic"..(Samuel:1993..pg 540)

DILGO KHENTSE RINPOCHE..(1910-1991)..."Shambhala looks like its not Buddhadharma, but itself is the essence of Buddhadharma. It is training of the mind that is a realization which embodies view, meditation and practice by itself. If one has that, then it is a path that is complete and will embody the perfect state of mind." (June 1987)

LONGCHENPA....(1308-1363)..."The Seminal Heart Movement began in the 11th century in Tibet and was systematized in the 14th century by Longchenpa. A reformulation of the Dzogchen. "The Treasury of the Supreme Vehicle" is a verifiable encyclopedia of Seminal Hear thought and practice." (Lopez: 1997...pg 293)...

10th KARMAPA...(1604-1674) was an excellent painter. He learnt the patterns for the painted representations of Kalapa." (Stein: 1972..pg 281)..

TILOPA...10th century Bengali yogin. Born in eastern region of Jago.

MIPHAM..(Jamgon Mipham Namgyal Gyatso).(1846-1912)..The Tibetan text: "The Lamp that Illuminates the Practice of the Miraculous Juthig of Existence" : interesting and clear descriptions of the Drala and Werma can be found in two passages from the monumental work on the Juthig divination. The first passage describes the 'Unicorn' Drala Seu Ruchig, one of the most important manifestations among Drala and Werma.Also information on Lha, Nyen, and Lu." (Norbu: 1995: pg 56) ... See also Mipham's: "The Great Commentary on the Kalachakra" for a description of Shambhala. (Trungpa:1984..pg 26)...."Mipham argued for a Madhyamika interpretation of the Nyingma teachings, in this respect opposing the tendancy of other Rimed teachers such as Jamgon Kongtrul to employ more positive (shentong) phraseology." (Samuel: 1993..pg 465)...

KARMALINGPA...."14th Century revelation entitled "The Profound Doctrine of Wisdoms Natural Freedom in Encountering the Peaceful and Wrathful Deities" known in the west as "The Tibetan Book of the Dead"....(Lopez: 1997...pg 458)...

ATISHA....(982-1054)...Atisha spent 12 years in Sumatra before he went to Tibet in 1042 AD to teach. He visited Mitra Vihara, near the Nepalese Therai. (Lopez: 1997...pg 174,163)....[See Chandra Lokesh: "Biography of Atisha"...Shata Pitaka Series: Delhi: 1982]...

CHOGYUR LINGPA...The Tibetan terma text: "Precious Casket to Realize Riches" by Chogyur Lingpa (1829-1870). A discussion of cha (cha'o?) and a ritual for summoning the cha and yang from the four directions: China, India, Tazig, and the North of Gesar". (Norbu:1995..pg 63)

JAMYANG KHYENTSE WANGPO...The Tibetan text: "The Obtainment of Glory, Wishes, Fortune and Longevity through the practice of Summoning the Yang" by Jamyang Khentsi Wangpo (1820-1892). Instructions on developing and increasing one's cha and yang...(Norbu:1995...Pg 73)

MARPA...."One of the most reknowned Tibetan masters and one of the main gurus of the Kagyu lineage. Marpa was just an ordinary person, involved in living every detail of his life. He never tried to be someone special. When he lost his temper, he just lost it. He just did it. He never acted or pretended. He had nothing to prove."..(Trungpa: 1973..pg 48)....

FIFTH DALAI LAMA...."(1617-1682)....Text: "Offering to the Five Deities of the Individual"

KHYUNGPO NALJOR...(978-1127)..."In his work 'An Impartial History of the Sources of Spiritual Instruction', Jamgon Kongtrul had great praise for Khyungpo Naljor, who mastered both Ancient Tibetan lineages and had more than 150 teachers. He founded the Shangpa lineage."...(Jamgon Kongtrul's Retreat Manual..pg 87)...

SUKASIDDHI...Khyungpo Naljor considered her to be one of the greatest of his 150 teachers."..(Kongtrul's Retreat Manual..pg 86)...

DUNS SCOTUS....(1270-1308 AD)..

DOGEN..."Time goes from present to past. This is not true in our logical mind, but it is in the actual experience of making past-time present. There we have poetry and there we have human life."..(Suzuki: 1970..pg 33)....

gSHEN-CHEN KLU-DGA....(996-1035)..."one of the most important figures in the terma tradition" (Karmay: 1975..pg 185)...

PLATO..."Idealized sun worship and called the Sun the offspring of the first god." (Hawkes: 1962..pg 198)...

BU-STON...(1290-1364)...famous Tibetan scholar

SHENRAP MIWO...."The work of Shenrap still exists in Tibet in the form of 400 volumes, but it has undergone heavy Buddhist editing." (Trungpa: 1978..pg 220)....The Tibetan texts "Ziji" (gZi brid) and "Zermig" (gZer mig)(Piercing Eye) Two biographies of Shenrab Miwo (Mibo)..... (Trungpa: 1978) :Shen = divine,heavenly,ally..... Rap = Supreme One.... Miwo = Great Man......The teacher who transmitted Bon into Tibet from Shang Shung (or Tazik) reportedly in 1800 BC. The Berlin manuscript of the Zermig has several unusual representations of Shenrap. (Kvaerne:1996)...The first seven chapters of the Zermig are translated by A.H. Francke and published in ASIA MAJOR (1924-27, 1930, 1939)...The Zi-brjid is an enormous work. 12 volumes numbered KA to DA with a final volume A......"born in a palace south of Mount Yungdrung Gutseg in 1857 B.C." (Wangyal: 1993..pg 29)..."Shen rab was born in Sam bha la (sTag gzigs) in the west in the town called Yans pa can, in the dwelling place of the 33 Gods, the palace called Barpo so brgyad". (Kvaerne: 1971..pg 220)..."sTon pa gShen rab mi bo and to his wife, Yum mTshan ldan blo sgron ma and to his mother: A ni Gung lhai rgyal mo." (Nebesky: 1952...pg 156)..."the first historical person sure of his magic, the archetype of the blue-robed warrior-king."..(Rao: 1978..pg 6+)..."the name gShen rab myi bo seems to appear at least six times in the Tun Huang manuscripts." (Norbu: 1995..pg 273)...

ZARATHUSTRA...."628-551 BC....Zarathustra launched his movement in Chorasmia (Persian Khorasan, Western Afghanistan, Yurkmen Republic). At the age of 30 he had his first encounter with Vohu Manah (Good Mind) on the River Daiti and was taken to an assembly of the cosmic gods." (James: 1963...pg 94)...

GESAR...(etymology: Gesar, Shah, Caesar, Kaiser, Tsar, etc).....(Ancient Persian word for sovereignity is Sahr)(Campbell:1968..pg 107)..[Research note: Gesar seems to manifest in various traditions, for some as an emissary of the Rigden Kings of Shambhala, in the Buddhist tradition Gesar is an emanation of Padma Sambhava, while in the case of the Tibetan Bon tradition, Gesar is sent by Shen Lha Okar. There is a Mongolian reference to Gesar and Sakyamuni Burkhan. It seems to depend upon one's heart connection to a particular lineage.].....Phrom or Khrom is "probably Byzantium and the Anatolian peoples." (Lopez: 1995...pg 272)..."The country of Phrom, where King Ge-sar ruled over the Turks (ie: Eastern Turkestan)." (Hoffman:1979)..."Gesar was the King of Trhom (Phrom), the place name Rum for Byzantium or Anatolia, the ancient Rome of the Near East. Ling is an abbreviation of the term denoting the whole world, ('dzam-gling: Jambudvipa)." (Stein: 1972..pg 280)....Conquered most of western Central Asis in the 7th Century AD..."Phrom or Khrom. Probably Byzantium and the Anatolian peoples." (Norbu: 1995...pg 272)...

KRSNACARYA...Buddhist Mahasiddha

MANI...."A treasure text discovered in Tibet in the 12th century called "The 100,000 Words of Mani"...(Lopez: 1997)...

MAR AMMO..."Mani's Teacher of the East. Went beyond Marv into the former Kusan dominions and reached districts near Balkh. Eastern Manichaeism made Parthian the official language of the Eastern Church. 6th Century AD." (Acta Iranica: Leiden: 1977..pg 49)...

KALACAKRAPADA...."One of the first exponents of the Kalachakra School. Wrote a commentary on the 'Vimalaprabhatika of Sri Pundarika', Pundarika's detailed commentary to the Laghukalacakratantra." (Orofino: 1996...pg 142)...

ME-Long DORJE....(1243-1303)...master of Dzogchen

TARANATHA...1574-1634...translated the Kalapavatara (Cabezon: 1996...pg 489)...

IBN AL-'ARABI....(Born: Spain 1165....Died: Damascus: 1240 AD). Sufi. Buried at Mt Qasiyun near Damascus. "Non-being is the mirror, the world the image, and man as the eye of the image in which the Person is hidden." (Nasr: 1964..pg 166)...

MAHASIDDHAS....Saraha, Tilopa, Naropa, Lavapa, Krsnacarya,

JAMGON KONGTRUL (Lodro Taye: 1813-1899)..."One may wonder why this description of the universe does not accord with that of other systems. The Enlightened Ones did not view any aspect of either the environment or the inhabitants of our world system as ultimately real. Therefore, the teachings are not one that, based on a belief in a single view, sets forth a particular system as the only valid one. Instead, they spoke in response to the various levels of capabilities, INTERESTS, and dispositions of those to be guided to enlightenment." ...(Jamgon Kongtrul:Myriad Worlds...1995..pg 166).

"Jamgon Kongtrul made things more curious by writing in his work: 'dgra-bla'."..(Karmay: 1975..pg 218...In reference to the Tibetan debate on the various spellings and meanings of the term we spell drala)...

DILGO KHENTSE RINPOCHE..(1910-1991)..."Shambhala looks like its not Buddhadharma, but itself is the essence of Buddhadharma. It is training of the mind that is a realization which embodies view, meditation and practice by itself. If one has that, then it is a path that is complete and will embody the perfect state of mind." (June 1987)

DOGEN..."Time goes from present to past. This is not true in our logical mind, but it is in the actual experience of making past-time present. There we have poetry and there we have human life."..(Suzuki: 1970..pg 33)....

"Shen rab was born in Sam bha la (sTag gzigs) in the west in the town called Yans pa can, in the dwelling place of the 33 Gods, the palace called Barpo so brgyad". (Kvaerne: 1971..pg 220)

Originally the word Bonpo meant someone who invoked the gods and summoned the spirits. Thus a Bonpo was an expert in the use of mantra and magical evocation. Mantra or ngak (sngags) is sound and sound is energy. Mantra is the primordial sound that calls the forms of all things into being out of the infinite potentiality of empty space which is the basis of everything. Sound or word has a creative power. But this term Bonpo in ancient times appeared to cover a number of different types of practitioner, whether shaman, magician, or priest. Here there seems to be a strong parallel of the role of the Bonpo in ancient Tibet with that of the Druid in ancient pre-Christian Europe. Just as the Druidic order was divided into the three functions of the Bards, the Vates, and the Druids, who were singers, soothsayers, and magicians respectively, so the ancient pre-Buddhist kingdom of Tibet was said to be protected by the Drung (sgrung) who were bards and singers of epics, the Deu (lde'u) who were soothsayers and diviners, and the Bonpo (bon-po) who were priests and magicians. Another archaic term closely related to Bonpo was Shen or Shenpo (gshen-po), and this term may have originally designated the shaman practitioner in particular. The Shen system of practice was transmitted through family lineages, especially in Western and Northern Tibet, then known as the country of Zhang-zhung, so that Shen also came to designate a particular ancient clan or tribe.

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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SHINTO Elements in the Shambhala Path

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SHINTO...."Being saved is a foreign idea in Japan...When you look into the mirror you know who you are deeper." (Yamamoto Negi of the Tsubaki Grand Shrine at RMSC in 1992)

In the Meiji Restoration of 1868....Shinto and Buddhism were separated by decree ....Buddhist effigies were ordered to be removed from Shinto shrines and all traces of Buddhism were purged from the imperial household.

Shinto is a polytheistic religion, venerating a vast pantheon of kami (gods or spirits) which range from the local deities of mountains or streams to the sun goddess Amaterasu. Natural phenomena and particular places are personified as kami, dead statesmen or other notables could be deified as kami, families or craft traditions revered their forefathers as kami, the reigning emperor was long regarded as a living kami.

"After the Meiji Imperial Restoration of 1868, the new government purged Shinto of Buddhist elements, or ordered to clearly segregate Buddhism from Shinto."

1868......The radicals who overthrew the Tokugawa shogunate in the Meiji Restoration of 1868 took Fukko Shinto as their ideology, and this became the new government's state creed. Shinto and Buddhism were separated by decree in 1868: Buddhist effigies were ordered to be removed from Shinto shrines and all traces of Buddhism were purged from the imperial household. Priests were made state employees, and the Ministry of Religion laid down detailed instructions on doctrine and ritual in a new system termed State Shinto.This concentrated on the more important shrines; folk Shinto practices were mostly left unmolested and various fringe Shinto movements dating from the Edo period were allowed to continue under the rubric Sect Shinto.

Shinto is a polytheistic religion, venerating a vast pantheon of kami (gods or spirits) which range from the local deities of mountains or streams to the sun goddess Amaterasu. Natural phenomena and particular places are personified as kami, dead statesmen or other notables could be deified as kami, families or craft traditions revered their forefathers as kami, the reigning emperor was long regarded as a living kami. A kami could loosely be termed the "spirit" of virtually any aspect of existence possessing its own discrete identity and vital force (tama). Japan is traditionally known as "the land of 8 million kami". The practice of Shinto consists chiefly of worshipping, propitiating, and otherwise dealing with the kami.

Shinto first arose in a preliterate culture as a religion of practice rather than creed, and practice remains fundamental to it. Two types of practice predominate: honouring the kami through prayer and offerings, and averting their wrath by cleansing oneself of impurity.

Trungpa Rinpoche incorporated other elements into the Shambhala Path that he thought would be beneficial to practitioners. From the Bön religion, the lhasang ceremony is performed; other elements of shamanism play a role. From Confucianism comes a framework of heaven, earth, and man for understanding the proper relationship between different elements of compositions of all kinds. From Taoism comes the use of feng shui and other incorporations. From the Shinto tradition comes the use of kami shrines to honor natural forces in specific locales.

"Tsubaki priests conducted a ceremony enshrining Amaterasu Ohmikami at the Rocky Mountain Dharma Center in Red Feather Lakes, Colorado. At the least, 550 attended the ritual, conducted July 18 by three priests of Tsubaki Grand Shrine of Japan -- Yukiyasu Jun Yamamoto, who will be the 97th chief priest of the shrine, Hitoshi Iwasaki, iormer head of Tsubaki U.S. shrine, and Tetsuji Ochiai, currently the priest of the U.S. shrine in Stockton, California. .....In the actual enshrinement, Rev. Yukiyasu Jun Yamamoto carried into the shrine four white-wrapped boxes symbolizing the spirit of four Kami -- Amaterasu Omikami, the sun goddess, Toyoukeno Ohkami, the god of food, Sarutahiko Ohkami, the god of guidance, Amenouzume no Mikoto, the god of harmony. After the ceremony guests saw the traditional Japanese arts of tea ceremony, Ikebana (flower arrangement), calligraphy, and bugaku (traditional Japanese court dance.)....The ceremony was requested by Rocky Mountain Dharma Center. This center, founded in 1971 by the late Chogyam Trangpa Rinpoche, is a contemplative center located in the Northern Colorado Rockies. Situated on 450 secluded acres of highland meadows and pine and aspen forest, it provides an ideal setting for yearround programs devoted to the study and practice of meditation......Chogyam Trangpa is best known to Western readers as the author of several popular books on Buddhism teachings, including Cutting through Spiritual Materialism, The Myth of Freedom of Meditation in Action. His volume, Shambhala, is a major departure from these earlier works. Shambhala is the path of warriorship, or the path of bravery, that is open to any human being who seeks a genuine and fearless existence. Chogyam Trangpa visited Ise Grand Shrine in Japan, and told his followers about Shinto, the indigenous religion of Japan. He said Shinto thought is similar to Shambhala and he decided to incorporate a Shinto shrine in the center......The shrine stands on a gentle pine-forested slope. A path of light-colored crushed limestone winds up the hillside from the meadow under two Torii gates before dividing into a loop that circles in front of the shrine compound. The shrine itself is inside a fenced area terraced with coarse white crushed rock.....The Tsubaki priests trained some center staff members -four men and one women, to make the daily offerings. Each of them makes the offerings a week at a time. They offer the water and the salt in the morning, after the sun has risen and they remove the water and salt before the sun goes down. Once a month, they add two bowls of sake and a bowl of rice to the daily offerings......Tsubaki appreciates their dedication to proper observance.".....http://www.csuchico.edu/~gwilliams/tsa/nl/enshrinement_in_colorado.html

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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25.9.12

The Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun

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"In 2004, Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche requested that a structure be built for the lineage of Sakyongs in Kalapa Valley to be used for the retreat described by his father the Druk Sakyong, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, in the Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun root text. The text is considered one of the most profound of the Druk Sakyong’s Shambhala teachings, and is the basis for the Werma Sadhana, a central practice for advanced students within the Shambhala community. Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche was to be the first person to do the Scorpion Seal retreat.
The design for the Scorpion Seal retreat building, also referred to as the Tenno Retreat building, was conceived by designer, architect, and feng shui consultant Gina Stick as a marriage of k’an-yu or feng shui with a Shambhala inspired sacred architecture. The building was strategically designed to gather and focus the land potential of the valley into the retreat building. Sacred architecture derives much of its power from the surrounding landform, accessed through strategic site selection and placement, and building design.
The design concept for the building was inspired by the Great Eastern Sun Vajra Assembly talks of the Druk Sakyong in which he describes the Seat of the Universal Monarch and the dawning of the Great Eastern Sun. Architecturally it was developed to invite the primal simplicity of the central drala or energy invoked in the Werma Sadhana, Shiwa Okar, and to empower the practitioner with the enriching stability of the Rigden King, an expression of Universal Monarch within the Shambhala Buddhist lineage.
In 2005 the first phase construction of the building was completed, and the Sakyong entered his Scorpion Seat retreat. The Sakyong communicated that he considered the structure - though unfinished - to be our first truly Shambhalian building, and that the final elements of the Rigden Abhisheka transmission arose auspiciously from that retreat.
In October 2008, the Sakyong hosted a powerful retreat gathering of acharyas at Kalapa Valley to further teach on the Scorpion Seal retreat in preparation for Scorpion Seal Assemblies to be offered to the community. In preparation for the Acharaya retreat, a second phase of construction was initiated, and some of the exterior siding of the building was installed.
The balance of the exterior is still incomplete and in danger of decay. The entry system - stairs and veranda - are not yet built. Heraldry for the building - designed as armor and to reflect and enhance the luminosity of the Great Eastern Sun - is in a schematic phase. The site needs substantial clean up from construction; grading; and finish landscaping to restore it to a natural state.
We ask your support to complete the building in appreciation of the Sakyong’s gift of opening the Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun teachings, and as our invocation for further blessing and teaching. Donations are tax deductible."...http://shambhalatimes.org/2011/03/03/twenty-years-of-ruling-and-teaching-part-four-blossoming/

"... in the beginning of 2005, the Sakyong completed the Scorpion Seal retreat. One of the final terma texts received in 1981 by the Dorje Dradül is called “The Scorpion Seal of the Golden Sun.” This text introduces advanced Shambhala practices. It is the basis for the Werma sadhana as well as the Rigden abhisheka. It contains also the description of a retreat practice. Many times, the Dorje Dradül mentioned that he wanted to do this retreat but for some reasons it never happened. For this retreat to become available to students, it first had to be completed by a sakyong. Many times during the preceding years, senior students had requested Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche to do this retreat. He had finally decided that the proper conditions had been gathered and that was the appropriate time. For that occasion, a special cabin was built at Kalapa Valley in Cape Breton, the land that had been discovered by the Dorje Dradül many years before and recognized as a particular power spot for the Shambhala lineage."........http://shambhalatimes.org/2011/03/03/twenty-years-of-ruling-and-teaching-part-four-blossoming/

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2005-06-26 - Sakyong Enters Second Scorpion Seal retreat.......Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche has begun his second Scorpion Seal retreat in Kalapa Valley, Cape Breton. The Sakyong has undertaken this sealed retreat in the new tenno building, part of which will be in darkness, to benefit the Shambhala community.

Scorpion Seal in Ancient Sasanian Iran, c. 500 A.D.

These seals date from about the fifth century C.E. Shown here are a rabbit, a bird, a scorpion and a stag carved in various kinds of stone.

The Sasanian Dynasty ruled in the area of what is now Iran from 224-651 C.E. The first king, Ardashir I, overthrew the Parthians, who had ruled Iran from 247 B.C.E. through 224 C.E. Ardashir and his successors built an empire that covered much of the area between what is now Iraq and India.

The official religion of the empire was Zoroastrianism, whose adherents believed in a creator god called Ohrmazd or Ahura Mazda. Zoroastrianism was founded by a Persian prophet named Zoroaster or Zarathustra. It is still practiced today in India by the Parsis. Other religions were practiced in the empire, including Christianity and Manichaeanism. The latter was founded by the prophet Mani in the 3rd century C.E. but was considered a dangerous heresy by the Zoroastrians.

The Sasanians were involved in long-distance trade, controlling the seagoing routes through the Arabian and Red Seas. They exported such goods as silver and gold vessels, cut glass, and brocades made from Chinese silk. The Sasanian rulers carried out military campaigns against Roman Syria in the 3rd century C.E., and against Syria, Palestine and Egypt in the early 7th century. The Sasanian Dynasty was finally overthrown by Islamic armies in 641 C.E., only 19 years after the Sasanians had nearly defeated the Byzantine empire at Constantinople.

Because there have been few archaeological surveys or scientific excavations in the region of the Sasanian empire, little material evidence has come to light from this period of Iran's history. Some building ruins have been found, the most interesting of which are several domed pavilions, probably used as temples, in which worship centered on fire, a symbol of the god Ahura Mazda's light and energy. Numerous Sasanian coins have been found as far away as China, and other material remains include small objects such as the animal seals shown here.

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Tibet's poet-saint, Jetsun Milarepa (1040-1143) did not begin as such.  In his youth, Milarepa studied black magic in order to seek revenge on the relatives who abandoned him to a life of bitter poverty following the death of his parents.  According to his student Rechugpa (1084-1161) he invoked a giant black scorpion to attack his uncle's house

A scorpion wheel charm is associated with a (Tibetan Buddhist) Nyingma Yamantaka practice.

In the fire puja of Vajradaka (Tib.: Dorje Khadro) who is a fierce and wrathful deity invoked to purify negative actions, black sesame seeds are used to represent problems and regrets.  They are arranged into the shape of a scorpion which is then consumed by fire as practitioners visualize all physical, psychological, emotional hindrances being annihilated compassionately by Dorje Khadro who joyously

The fascination or threatening gesture (Skt. tarjini mudra) consists of a fist with forefinger and little finger extended; it is called the "forefinger-scorpion gesture" (Tib. Digzub Chagya.) Legend says that when the apostate king Langdarma was attempting to suppress Buddhism in Tibet, mahasiddha Nubchen Sangyé Yeshé terrified him by using the gesture to create a scorpion apparition "as big as nine yaks" that appeared above the king.

Begtse is a Mongol war god that legend says, converted to Buddhism in the 16th-century at the sight of the Dalai Lama's transformation into Chenrezi, the Bodhisattva of Compassion.  As a consequence, he became a symbol of pacification and the last in the series of 8 (or 9) Tibetan Buddhist dharma protectors or Dharmapalas.

"He is represented with all the ornaments of the Dharmapala, brandishing a sword in his right hand, the handle of which is in the shape of a scorpion. His left hand holds the orange heart of an enemy near his mouth, clutching at the same time a bow and an arrow. He tramples upon the corpse of a man with his left foot and the carcass of a horse with his right foot. His three eyes are full of fury directed at the enemies of the dharma.

Scorpion in Tibetan is digpa ratsa means negative- , or harmful action and also, menace.  As in the symbolism of Beg-tse, it is evocative of the Buddha-dharma's power to transmute bad, even deadly, circumstances into beneficial ones.  It is therefore used as a seal by the Vajrayana or tantric Buddhist masters who can effect transformations.  The Ngak'chang Rinpoche has a scorpion seal, and the late Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche’s red scorpion seal may sometimes be seen on his calligraphies. 

A stylized scorpion is often used as a seal by Tantric Lamas. It has 3 eyes, 8 five-segmented legs, and a tail with nine joints. The mathematics gives 52, the number of weeks in a year. It is coloured blue, green and red to stand for 3 of the five traditional elements: space/ether, air, and fire

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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THE NINE WAYS OF BON

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The first four levels of Bon are referred to as the Causal Vehicles. They are the shamanic levels.

There are three biographies of Tonpa Shenrab. The earliest and shortest one is known as Dodu (mDo-'dus: 'Epitome of Aphorisms'); the second is in two volumes and is called Zermig (gZer-mig: 'Piercing Eye'). These two accounts were rediscovered as terma (see below) in the 10th and 11th centuries respectively.

The third and largest is the twelve volume work entitled Zhiji (gZi-brjid: 'The Glorious'). This last book belongs to the category of scriptures known as Nyan gyud (bsNyan-rgyud: oral transmission), and was dictated to Londen Nyingpo (bLo-ldan snying-po) who lived in the 14th century. (1)

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(1). The gZer-mig and gZi-brjid are both published by the Bonpo Foundation, Dolanji, 1965 and 1967-69, respectively. Extracts from the gZi-brjid have been edited and translated by D.L. Snellgrove, The Nine Ways of Bon, London Oriental Series, vol. 18, London 1967. The first seven chapters of gZer-mig and part of the eighth have been translated into English by A.H. Franke, 'A Book of the Tibetan Bonpos', Asia Major, Leipzig 1924, 1926, 1927, 1930; Asia Major (New Series) 1, London 1949. A summary of the contents of gZer-mig has been made by H. Hoffmann in The Religions of Tibet, London 1961, 85-96.

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According to the system of the lho-gter (Southern Treasure) the Nine Ways are:

Causal Ways (rGyui-theg-pa) comprises the first four,

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1.Way of Prediction (Phyva-gshen Theg-pa) codifies ritual, prognostication, sortilege and astrology;

Chashen thegpa (Phywa-gshen theg-pa), the Way of the Shen of Prediction, describes four different ways of prediction, by divination (mo), astrology (rtsis), ritual (gto) and examination of causes (dphyad).....

Chashen (The way of the Shen of Prediction), Chashen, the first way, comprises medical diagnosis and healing, as well as various ancient divination and astrological rites performed by the shaman to determine whether the person who needs to be healed has an energetic imbalance, or is being provoked by a demonic spirit, or negative energy (as mentioned above). Nowadays these rites are still widely practised in Tibetan communitites.

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2.Way of the Visual World (sNang-shen theg-pa) details the psychophysical Universe;

Nangshen thegpa (sNang-gshen theg-pa), the Way of the Shen of Visible Manifestation, expounds the origin and nature of gods and demons living in this world and various methods of exorcism and ransom.

Nangshen (The Way of the Shen of the Visible World), ......The second way, Nangshen, comprises various rituals for purification to summon energy and enhance prosperity, to suppress and liberate negative forces, and to invoke and make offerings to powerful deities and pay ransoms to demonic spirits.

These practices are very widespread in Tibet. Families perform small ones, while large scale ones are usually performed collectively in towns, villages and monasteries. In ransom rites, an effigy is prepared which represents the beneficiary of the rite, or the shamanic practitioner who is performing it. I remember when my mother had been ill for a long time we tried to heal her by means of different medical treatments, but nothing helped. We then performed several minor rites, but these did not work either. So finally we invited some shaman monks, who performed a big ransom rite, in which they prepared a large effigy of her (in fact, people often make life-size effigies) and we dressed it in her clothes, so that it was very lifelike and resembled her closely. Then we performed the ritual, offering the effigy in her place to repay her karmic debt to spirits. She was given a new name, Yehe Lhamo, in place of her old name, Drolma, as a kind of new birth into the world, and she recovered from her illness.

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3. Way of Illusion ('Phrul-gshen theg-pa) explains the rites for the dispersal of adverse thoughtforms, entities and energies;

Trulshen thegpa ('Phrul-gshen theg-pa), the Way of the Shen of Magical Power, explains rites for disposing of adverse powers

Trulshen (The Way of the Shen of 'Magical' Illusion).......Shamans of the third way, Trulshen, go where there is strong, wild energy, where they perform practices to conquer the spirits and demons that inhabit those places, subjugating them into their service. One achieves this through practising mantra (words of magic power), mudra (meaningful hand gestures to communicate with gods and spirits), and samadhi (meditation), while performing sadhanas (devotional practices) to engage various wrathful goddesses such as Walmo and Chenmo. The aim of these wrathful practices, which are directed against enemies of the teaching, are to protect the practitioners and the teaching against danger and threats. It is very important to perform these actions with an attitude of love and compassion towards other beings, and should not be performed solely for the shaman's benefit..

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4.Way of Existence (Srid-gshen theg-pa) details funeral and death rituals;

Sishen thegpa (Srid-gshen theg-pa), the Way of the Shen of Existence, deals with the after-death state (bar-do) and with methods for guiding sentient beings towards liberation or at least towards a better rebirth....

Working with the soul of the living and the dead, is the most important feature of the fourth way, Sichen, which contains a detailed explanation of the principle of the la (soul), yid (mind), and sem (thinking mind). "The la is the karmic trace, which is stored in the kunzhi namshe, (or base consciousness). The sem follows the karmic trace and produces blissful, painful and neutral experiences which are experienced by the yid." When a living person's soul is lost, shattered, or disordered, there are practices to recall and reinforce its energy, such as soul retrieval. In relation to the dead, there are explanations of 81 different types of death, such as accidental death, suicide, murder, and sinister death. Following these kinds of death, it is very important to perform appropriate rites, especially if the death occurs in a place which is energetically disturbed (for instance, a place where untoward events such as accidents regularly occur).

A particular specific method found in this way, is that of the 'four doors', to vanquish negative spirits, using 360 different methods. There are also funeral rites to guide the soul immediately after death, communicating with the ghost of the deceased and feeding it until its next rebirth. One of the most important practices performed by Tibetan shamans of the sichen path is soul retrieval - Lalu (literally redeeming, or buying back the soul), and Chilu, (redeeming the life-energy).

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Resultant Ways ('Brns-bu'i-theg-pa) covers the second suite of four; and in closure;

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5.Way of a Lay Follower (dGe-bsnyen theg-pa) contains the ten principles for wholesome activity;

Genyen thegpa (dGe-snyen theg-pa), the Way of Virtuous Lay Practitioners, guides those who apply the ten virtues and ten perfections.

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6. Way of a Monk, (Drnag-srnng theg-pa) codifies monastic rules and regulations;

Drangsong thegpa (Drang-srong theg-pa), the Way of the Sages, contains the rules of monastic discipline.

7.Way of Primordial Sound (Adkar theg-pa) charts the integration of an exalted practitioner into the mandala of highest enlightenment;

Akar thegpa (A-dkar theg-pa), the Way of the White A, explains the practices and rituals of the higher Tantras.....

WHITE 'A'..."O great White Light of (the letter) A of the womb of space"(Nalanda Translation Committee: Lopez:1997..pg 403)....The seventh level in the Nine Ways of Bon is the Way of the White Letter A (A-dkar theg-pa). (Snellgrove:1967)....."A' represents the unconditioned primordial state, the natural state of mind; it is white to represent the innate purity of mind." (Wangyal: 1993..pg 41)..."The Seventh Vehicle is 'The White A'. The sacred A is the symbol of the 'Pure Sound'...the origin of all earthly sounds and of all effects in the phenomenal world." (Hoffman: 1975...pg 110)...

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8. Way of Primordial Shen, (Ye-gshen theg-pa) renders the guidelines for seeking a true tantric master and the samaya that binds a disciple to his tantric master; and in summation

Yeshen thegpa (Ye-gshen theg-pa), the Way of the Primordial Shen, stresses the need for a suitable teacher, place and occasion for Tantric practices, explains the mandala in greater detail as well as instructions for deity meditation.

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Unsurpassable Way or the Way of Dzogchen (Khyad-par chen-po'i-theg-pa or rDzogs-chen) is the ninth.

9. Way of Supreme Doctrine or The Way of Dzogchen (Bla-med theg-pa) enshrines Dzogchen.

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Lame thegpa (bLa-med theg-pa), the Unsurpassed Way, is concerned with the highest attainment through the path of Great Perfection (i.e., rDzogs-chen).

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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THE FIVE ELEMENTS IN ANCIENT TRADITIONS

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Text: The Five Elements In Tibetan Shamanism and Tantra.....by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.......October 1998

"In many indigenous traditions, we relate with the raw elements. Fire Pujas, Earth Ceremonies, rituals near springs, Sky and Space rituals.....Basically we are relating with the raw elements and their related spirit realms.....If you do not have a reference place when we talk about spirits, do a little dzogchen practive and feel spacious......Inviting the four guests......The shrine is basically the house of the enlightened first guest....such as Shen Lha Okar.,.....not really for the 2nd (Gods) , 3rd (Karmic Guests), or 4th (Guests of Compassion) Guests......

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MANICHAEISM.........According to Mani the First-Man now emanates sons as a man who puts on his armor for the combat. These five sons are the five elements opposed to the five aeons of darkness: Clear Air, Refreshing Wind, Bright Light, Life-Giving Waters, and Warming Fire. He put on first the aerial breeze, then threw over himself light as a flaming mantle, and over this light a covering of water; he surrounded himself with gusts of wind, took light as his lance and shield, and cast himself downward toward the line of danger.

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BONPO.......Indigenous healing and spiritual traditions around the world are based on an understanding of the five elements. In the Tibetan tradition, these are known as space, air, fire, water and earth, and are understood as the underlying energies from which the physical world, our bodies, our emotions, and our minds arise. The elements are addressed in all nine levels of teachings of Bön, including shamanism, tantra and Dzogchen.

The much antipated new book by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche on the Elements as taught in the Tibetan Bon tradition. Rinpoche discuses the sacred healing aspect of the five elements of earth, water, fire, air and space. He offers detailed explanations of practices that help us to deeply connect with the elements in their natural form (shamanism), in their energetic aspect (tantra), and in their most subtle dimension of light (Dzogchen).

Transcripts of teachings held at Ligmincha Institute's retreat center, Serenity Ridge, Shipman, Virginia, from October 18-22, 2000. Includes teachings on the elements, the five Tsa Lung (channels and vital breath) exercises, and the Practice of Sherab Chamma, the Wisdom, Loving Mother, all from the perspective of Dzogchen.

Transcripts of Teachings  The Five Elements in Tibetan Shamanism and Tantra The Oral Teachings of Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche By Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche

 

 Prayers and Practice Books  The Healing Practice of the Five Elements Goddesses

  “The Healing Practice of the Five Elements Goddesses” was composed by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, and is explained in his latest book, “Healing with Form, Energy and Light: The Five Elements in Tibetan Shamanism, Tantra, and Dzogchen”. It is presented here in traditional Tibetan pecha format, as are our other practice books, printed on a series of individual cards. In addition to instruction on practicing with the individual elemental goddesses (of earth, water, fire, air and space) as is presented in the book, here there is also a detailed explanation on “The Combination Practice of the Five Elements Goddesses.”    

  Interesting Text: "The Five Elements In Tibetan Shamanism and Tantra".....by Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche.......October 1998

"In many indigenous traditions, we relate with the raw elements. Fire Pujas, Earth Ceremonies, rituals near springs, Sky and Space rituals.....Basically we are relating with the raw elements and their related spirit realms.....If you do not have a reference place when we talk about spirits, do a little dzogchen practive and feel spacious......Inviting the four guests......The shrine is basically the house of the enlightened first guest....such as Shen Lha Okar.,.....not really for the 2nd (Gods) , 3rd (Karmic Guests), or 4th (Guests of Compassion) Guests......

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MANICHAEISM .........According to Mani the First-Man now emanates sons as a man who puts on his armor for the combat. These five sons are the five elements opposed to the five aeons of darkness: Clear Air, Refreshing Wind, Bright Light, Life-Giving Waters, and Warming Fire. He put on first the aerial breeze, then threw over himself light as a flaming mantle, and over this light a covering of water; he surrounded himself with gusts of wind, took light as his lance and shield, and cast himself downward toward the line of danger.

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Email....okarresearch@gmail.com

September 2012

John Hopkins....Northern New Mexico

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